Australian Farmland In High Demand

Via Farm Weekly, a report on sustained global interest in Australia’s farmland: INSTITUTIONAL investors have continued to find Australian agricultural assets appealing, according to Colliers International. The real estate company, which specialises in large-scale, high value asset transactions and whose clients are commonly corporate farmers and investors, released a research and forecast report which said […]

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Corporate Interests vs. The Amazon

Via Vanity Fair, a look at one example of how Brazil’s richest landowners have seized more property than all the land in Spain, England, France, and Germany combined: The farmers arrived before dusk, setting up camp in the tall grass. There were 25 of them, and for months they had been attempting to occupy a sprawling […]

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Seeds of Gulf-Africa Agribusiness

Via The Cairo Review of Global Affairs, an article examining how – when Gulf nations face food, security, and water scarcity issues – one response is to seek lucrative agricultural investments in fertile African lands: Soaring temperatures, sun-baked earth, and dwindling water supplies: the Arabian Gulf’s blistering hot summer this year was, for many, a […]

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Saudi-based Bateel Expands Farming Operations Into Africa

Via Arabian Business, a report on some joint-venture agreements to be signed this year for new date farms in South Africa and Namibia: Saudi-based gourmet date connoisseur Bateel has revealed plans to expand the farming side of the business into the international market. CEO Dr Ata Atmar told Arabian Business the company is hoping to tie up […]

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Food-Insecure Zimbabwe Turns To Belarus To Revive Ag Sector

Via Zimbabwe’s The Independent, a report on Zimbabwe’s decision to reach out to Belarus to help revive its agricultural sector: President Emmerson Mnangagwa is planning to parcel out vast tracts of prime horticultural land to the Belarusian government in a deal that will see the eastern European nation farming and exporting produce globally while capacitating local […]

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Sucked Dry: Water and Land Grabs In Africa’s Nile River Basin

Via the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, a look at how huge swaths of land acquired by foreign investors in Africa’s Nile River Basin export profits and displace communities: Alice Nyamihanda was only a toddler beginning to walk and talk when she was forced away from her home. At just three years old, the child […]

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About This Blog And Its Author
Seeds Of A Revolution is committed to defining the disruptive geopolitics of the global Farms Race.  Due to the convergence of a growing world population, increased water scarcity, and a decrease in arable land & nutrient-rich soil, a spike of international investment interest in agricultural is inevitable and apt to bring a heretofore domestic industry into a truly global realm.  Whether this transition involves global land leases or acquisitions, the fundamental need for food & the protectionist feelings this need can give rise to is highly likely to cause such transactions to move quickly into the geopolitical realm.  It is this disruptive change, and the potential for a global farms race, that Seeds Of A Revolution tracks, analyzes, and forecasts.

Educated at Yale University (Bachelor of Arts - History) and Harvard (Master in Public Policy - International Development), Monty Simus has long held a keen interest in natural resource policy and the geopolitical implications of anticipated stresses in the areas of freshwater scarcity, biodiversity reserves & parks, and farm land.  Monty has lived, worked, and traveled in more than forty countries spanning Africa, China, western Europe, the Middle East, South America, and Southeast & Central Asia, and his personal interests comprise economic development, policy, investment, technology, natural resources, and the environment, with a particular focus on globalization’s impact upon these subject areas.  Monty writes about freshwater scarcity issues at www.waterpolitics.com and frontier investment markets at www.wildcatsandblacksheep.com.